Multiple Sclerosis affects three times as many women as it does males.

Multiple Sclerosis affects three times as many women as it does males.

MS is hard to diagnose since its symptoms are similar to many neurological illnesses. Doctors may suggest seeing a neurologist if they suspect this issue.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) affects the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves, causing vision, balance, muscular control, and other problems.

While the illness affects everyone differently, some may have moderate symptoms and need no therapy, while others may have problems doing daily duties.

MS is thought to be an autoimmune condition where the immune system assaults myelin (fatty substance that protects our nerve fibers).

MS isn't inherited, however genetic factors make certain people susceptible. Smokers and women are more prone to develop MS.

How to identify the onset of Multiple Sclerosis?

1Vision Problems 2 Tingling and Numbness     Sensations 3 Muscle Weakness and Spasms 4 Problems with Balance and     Coordination 5  Fatigue

MS is hard to diagnose because its symptoms are similar to other neurological illnesses. As a suspect of this problem, doctors may prescribe a neurologist consultation.